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IBM Sponsored Report Says Linux 40% Less Expensive Than Windows, 54% Less Expensive Than Solaris

Robert Frances Group Report: "TCO for Application Servers: Comparing Linux with Windows and Solaris"

According to a report based on a research study commissioned by IBM, Linux provides a lower overall TCO compared to Windows or Solaris for J2EE application server environments. The report's authors found Linux to be 40% less expensive than similarly configured Windows on x86 systems, and 54% less expensive than Solaris on SPARC.

The report, by the Robert Frances Group (RFG) is entitled: "TCO for Application Servers:Comparing Linux with Windows and Solaris."

"In an effort to provide accurate TCO data to enterprise IT executives," the report states, "RFG performed a quantitative analysis to highlight current operating system experiences in the enterprise. RFG contacted key buyers and IT decision makers across a range of industries, evaluated their level of satisfaction with each operating system, and performed a TCO analysis incorporating their cost data. Because it would be difficult, if not impossible, to evaluate every possible application stack in a single study, RFG examined an application infrastructure layer common to most enterprises – application servers. The application server is a critical infrastructure component for many companies, and thus represents an ideal target for operating system selection."

The full report can be viewed, as a PDF, here.

In its Conclusions, the report says:

"Linux provides a lower overall TCO compared to Windows or Solaris for J2EE application serverenvironments; RFG found Linux to be 40 percent less expensive than similarly configured Windows on x86 systems, and 54 percent less expensive than Solaris on SPARC."
"Linux competitors have brought costs down over the last few years," the Conclusions continue; "However, deltas in support and management costs, and improvements in how customers manage their Linux systems, will likely allow Linux to retain its position as the lowest-cost option."

The report ends as follows:

"IT executives faced with shrinking budgets and increasing workloads should thus evaluate Linux as an alternative to other operatingsystem choices. Linux also provides a number of strategic benefits not available in Solaris or Windows. It is available for a broad range of hardware platforms, and is cost-competitive when scaled well both horizontally and vertically. Further, it enjoys solid ISV support, and is available from a number of vendors in several licensing and support models.

Linux is thus a flexible platform for enterpris eapplication workloads, and IT executives should explore these aspects to maximize the long-term value of their Linux deployments. Ultimately, RFG believes IT departments must be extremely agile and flexible in order to successfully meet current and future service demands. Data collected in this TCO study shows Linux is not only less expensive, but also provides a range of monetary and strategic benefits that help meet these needs. A move to Linux is thus well-aligned with these goals, and RFG believes IT executives should seriously evaluate Linux for their companies' application server workloads."

The report notes that the work involved in performing the study was commissioned by IBM Corp. "However," it states, "the views expressed herein are those of Robert Frances Group, and do not necessarily reflect or represent those of IBM."

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Most Recent Comments
opensolaris.org 09/11/05 03:43:23 AM EDT

Give me a break, how far can you skew research in your favour and still claim it to be credible ?

I downloaded the report, made a hardcopy printout, read one line :

"Linux received a further benefit because two environments contained an Open Source J2EE server, which removed one element of cost" ( Page 6, Top of the page )

The most well known open source J2EE servers ( JBOSS etc. ) run on Solaris and as a matter of fact, Windows as well. So yes , thank you for telling us how you skewed the report, next time hide these facts, maybe more people will be fooled.

The second line that made me tear up the report while laughing and read no further was the explanation of how JVM's are licensed per CPU ( Page 5, Bottom of the page) , bogus the JVM from Sun is FREE for deployment and use , read the agreement at the java download web page if you have any doubts.

Sorry IBM, I suggest you ask for you money back , Pixie dust is not a replacement for credibility, this propaganda attempt was not successful.