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The API Lab

Isn’t it about time for more creative solutions around API documentation?

Promotion is a problem faced by every API developer. Long nights of coding have given form to the stroke of genius you had six months ago in the cafe. You’ve just written the API that will serve as the front door into your application. But how do you document this so that your peers will use it—and hopefully make you rich in the process?

Java had Javadoc, an innovation that managed to strike a surprisingly effective balance between ease of use and systematization (three cheers for strong typing and static binding). Web services “solved” the interface definition problem with WSDL, a standard only its authors could love (and some of these won’t admit to participating in conception). To the registry crowd was left the task of devising clever ways to document a SOAP API around the torturous abstractions of WSDL so that humans could grok it as effectively as the machines. Few would argue that their solutions were, well, solutions.

RESTful APIs neither benefit nor suffer from formalized approach and automation. Every so often WADL pokes its head up, only to be knocked decisively back into its hole in a community game of Standards-Whac-A-Mole. REST is—and indeed, has always been—a style that resists any formalism that threatens its simplicity and accessibility. For this, above all, the community deserves praise.

But this does leave a hole around documentation. APIs tend to be described-by-wiki, which can be great or just awful, depending on a developer’s ability to write and discipline to update. Good ideas like ProgrammableWeb showcase both of these extremes; however, the site suffers in particular from out-of-date API descriptions which is too bad.

Outside of the eventual acceptance en masse of some kind of standardized wiki template for APIs (which I think is actually quite likely), we probably won’t see substantial change in API documentation soon. Minor changes, though, can still count for a lot, and it’s worth pointing these out.

Google, always an innovator to watch, create a lot of APIs. They recently published the Periodic Table of Google APIs, which as its name suggests is a clever way to visually categorize their API portfolio into groups like mobile, data, geo, etc. It’s a bit gimmicky, but it is also fun and actually inspired me to try some new Google APIs that I wasn’t aware of before.

So, isn’t it about time for more creative solutions around API documentation?

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More Stories By Scott Morrison

K. Scott Morrison is the Chief Technology Officer and Chief Architect at Layer 7 Technologies, where he is leading a team developing the next generation of security infrastructure for cloud computing and SOA. An architect and developer of highly scalable, enterprise systems for over 20 years, Scott has extensive experience across industry sectors as diverse as health, travel and transportation, and financial services. He has been a Director of Architecture and Technology at Infowave Software, a leading maker of wireless security and acceleration software for mobile devices, and was a senior architect at IBM. Before shifting to the private sector, Scott was with the world-renowned medical research program of the University of British Columbia, studying neurodegenerative disorders using medical imaging technology.

Scott is a dynamic, entertaining and highly sought-after speaker. His quotes appear regularly in the media, from the New York Times, to the Huffington Post and the Register. Scott has published over 50 book chapters, magazine articles, and papers in medical, physics, and engineering journals. His work has been acknowledged in the New England Journal of Medicine, and he has published in journals as diverse as the IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, the Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow, and Neurology. He is the co-author of the graduate text Cloud Computing, Principles, Systems and Applications published by Springer, and is on the editorial board of Springer’s new Journal of Cloud Computing Advances, Systems and Applications (JoCCASA). He co-authored both Java Web Services Unleashed and Professional JMS. Scott is an editor of the WS-I Basic Security Profile (BSP), and is co-author of the original WS-Federation specification. He is a recent co-author of the Cloud Security Alliance’s Security Guidance for Critical Areas of Focus in Cloud Computing, and an author of that organization’s Top Threats to Cloud Computing research. Scott was recently a featured speaker for the Privacy Commission of Canada’s public consultation into the privacy implications of cloud computing. He has even lent his expertise to the film and television industry, consulting on a number of features including the X-Files. Scott’s current interests are in cloud computing, Web services security, enterprise architecture and secure mobile computing—and of course, his wife and two great kids.

Layer 7 Technologies: http://www.layer7tech.com
Scott's linkedIn profile.
Twitter: @KScottMorrison
Syscon blog: http://scottmorrison.sys-con.com

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