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The Growing Adoption of Private and Public Clouds | Part 1

(Private Cloud Architectures)

While technology changes on a regular basis, IT teams have had a standard approach to administration. In recent years, however, there has been a drastic shift in data center administration. One of the biggest shifts is the adoption of private and public clouds. In part one of this series, we will examine private cloud architectures.

Today, companies keep more and more data electronically in lieu of hard copies. Whether they are large multi-layer Photoshop images or files that need to be kept in order to comply with medical or financial regulations, files are getting bigger and there are certainly more of them. Historically, companies would have a series of onsite servers, a backup and retrieval system, miscellaneous supporting hardware, and lots of documented procedures. This would ultimately lead to a never-ending need for new capital expenditures. Above all, one of the biggest issues IT admins wrestle with is managing and adding server space to accommodate all those ever-growing files. Enter the cloud.

According to a forecast from IDC, worldwide spending on hosted private cloud (HPC) services will be more than $24 billion in 2016. Many enterprise organizations are now looking to private cloud architectures as a more efficient solution to the ongoing storage fight. A private cloud would be implemented inside the corporate firewall in order to keep the system secure and available only to employees. A cloud-based architecture is also financially prudent as well as simple to adapt as business needs change.

Even though more and more of the general public have heard of "the cloud," few really understand what it is all about. Management could easily question if it is as secure as on-site servers, if everything would really be within the company's control, and if it would be reliable. The truth is that these concerns are easy to allay. What is important to convey to upper management when discussing the idea of moving to a private cloud is that this is not as new a technology as some think. It has been around for quite a while and it utilized by thousands of companies around the world.

Implementing a private cloud project will require time and a skilled team, which is why many companies decide to employ a third-party for implementation and cloud management. By utilizing a third-party company for hosting, they would be responsible for keeping hardware up-to-date and applying security patches. They would work directly with the on-site IT team to manage backups and retrievals as well as work to have a better understanding of the ongoing technology needs of the business. Ultimately, this will free-up the IT team to work on other enterprise-level projects. It will also loosen up capital expenditures usually spent on data center management and upkeep. Third party implantation and management company Coraid's private cloud solution offers a viable alternative to legacy storage.

What might be most important when it comes to a private cloud is its flexibility, simplicity, and economy of scale it offers. When IT teams rethink their approach to storage architecture, and partner with a qualified third-party, they will quickly realize all the benefits of private cloud use.

When employed correctly, utilizing a private cloud-based system, efficiencies will be identified, and cost savings will be discovered.

More Stories By Sara Williams

Sara Williams is a consultant at Coraid. Coraid is a leading provider of network storage solutions. Coraid delivers scale-out performance, Ethernet simplicity, and an elastic storage architecture to handle massive data growth. Designed from the ground up for virtualization and cloud architectures, Coraid's platform has been deployed by more than 1,700 customers worldwide.