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Cloud Expo: Article

Key Data Residency Requirements Global Organizations Need to Understand

…And some advice on how to satisfy them as you move to the cloud

One challenge more and more enterprises are grappling with as they plan to adopt the cloud is data residency & sovereignty. They are finding that if they want to use a cloud service hosted outside of their borders, life can become quite complex. Perhaps it is a result of the often discussed "Snowden Effect," but no one can deny that countries and regions are putting some strict guidelines in place to ensure privacy of sensitive data that is moving outside of their borders. These three examples are indicative of what I foresee we will be seeing much more of:

Australia: The Privacy Amendment Act
The Privacy Amendment Act introduced many changes to the original Privacy Act and just recently went into effect. The Act includes a set of new privacy principles that cover the processing of personal information by government agencies and businesses. The new principles are called jointly called the Australian Privacy Principles (APPs).

In the context of cloud adoption, agencies and businesses that deal with personal information are subject to APP8 (cross-border disclosure of personal information) which regulates the disclosure/transfer of personal information by an agency or business to a different entity (including a parent company) offshore. Before moving this type of data offshore, the Australian agency/business (Australian sender) must take reasonable steps to ensure the overseas recipient will comply with / not breach the APPs. The Australian Sender will remain liable for the overseas recipient's acts associated with any transferred personal information and, where relevant, be in breach of the APPs due to the overseas recipient's acts or omissions. In addition, APP11.1 (security of personal information) requires that an organization must "take reasonable steps to protect the personal information it holds from misuse".

Germany: The Federal Data Protection Act
Germany's Federal Data Protection Act is known as Bundesdatenschutzgesetz or BDSG, and these laws were reformed to cover a range of data protection-related issues. The key principles of the law state that organizations cannot collect any personally identifiable information without express permission from an individual (this includes obvious things like name and date of birth, as well as less obvious things like phone number, address and computer IP address). The permission that an individual grants must specify how, where, how long and for what purposes the data may be used and the individual can revoke the permission at any time.

Organizations must have policies, procedures and controls in place to protect all data types and categories that fall under the BDSG umbrella. Further, Germany does not recognize Safe Harbor regulations in the same way as other EU states (note - other EU states are re-examining this issue). It requires all parties involved in data transfer to assure that Safe Harbor requirements are met in a more formalized and structured manner.

In addition to the Federal Data Protection Act, components of the German criminal code regulate personal data protection, particularly for telecommunications, healthcare, and insurance companies. And all of the 16 German states have their own specific data protection laws pertaining to these areas.

United Kingdom: The UK Data Protection Act
The UK Data Protection Act is the UK's legislation covering the processing of data on people and is the main piece of legislation that governs the protection of personal data in the UK. The Act places clear demands upon those holding personal data in terms of the security that must be applied to protect it and it is necessary to apply a wide range of security measures to meet these standards:

  • Data must be processed fairly and lawfully
  • Data must be processed in accordance with the rights and freedoms of data subjects
  • Data must be protected against unauthorized or unlawful processing and against accidental loss, destruction or damage
  • Data must not be transferred to a country or territory outside the European Economic Area unless that country or territory protects the rights and freedoms of the data subjects.

The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) is the UK's independent authority set up to uphold information rights in the public interest. They recently provided guidance around the use of cloud computing reiterating that the responsibility for data protection remains with the data controller (the enterprise). And particular consideration should be given to mitigating the security risks relating to personal data since foreign law enforcement agencies may have the power to demand access to personal data stored in a foreign data center. Failing to protect private data can result in ICO-levied fines.

What is an organization to do? Look exclusively at cloud solutions that are based wholly in the country where they operate? Avoid cloud services altogether? Both of these approaches are impractical. Enterprises need to adopt cloud-based solutions, the best ones available irrespective of location, in order to drive their businesses and remain competitive. So what to do? Technology in the form of Cloud Data Control Gateways (CDCGs) using a technique called tokenization can help.

CDCGs are increasingly being used by global organizations to meet data residency requirements. Using tokenization, where clear text data is replaced by a surrogate token (check out a cool infographic describing the technique here), sensitive data can remain physically onsite while only surrogate replacement tokens go to the cloud for processing and storage. This solution enables enterprises to use public cloud applications no matter where they are located because actual data never needs to leave their in-country data center where the tokenization process occurs. It is a simple and straightforward way to adhere to complex data residency/sovereignty requirements. For those concerned about the "Snowden Effect," the reality is that any requests for information through one of their US-based cloud providers cannot result in compromising customer or corporate data without the enterprise being part of the conversation.

Of course, not all tokenization technologies are created equal. This solution only works when it is designed and deployed properly so as to fulfill all data obfuscation goals and objectives. Most important, it needs to be part of a gateway approach that ensures that the functionality of the cloud application is not disrupted for cloud end users. For example, users need to be able to use the cloud as if the gateway was not in the middle of the equation at all (e.g., they need to be able to Search or Sort on data that has been tokenized).

Please check out our website, which offers more insights on data sovereignty and tokenization with specific pages addressing laws in a number of countries as well as sector-based requirements for verticals like Banking and Healthcare. We also provide various reference pieces, including a broader whitepaper, International Privacy Laws.

Read the original blog entry...


Perspecsys Inc. is a leading provider of cloud data tokenization and cloud encryption solutions that enable mission-critical cloud applications to be adopted throughout the enterprise. Cloud security companies like Perspecsys remove the technical, legal and financial risks of placing sensitive company data in the cloud. Perspecsys accomplishes this for many large, heavily regulated companies across the world by never allowing sensitive data to leave a customer's network, while maintaining the functionality of cloud applications. For more information please visit perspecsys.com or follow on Twitter @perspecsys.

More Stories By Gerry Grealish

Gerry Grealish is Vice President, Marketing & Products, at PerspecSys. He is responsible for defining and executing PerspecSys’ marketing vision and driving revenue growth through strategic market expansion and new product development. Previously, he ran Product Marketing for the TNS Payments Division, helping create the marketing and product strategy for its cloud-based payment gateway and tokenization/encryption security solutions. He has held senior marketing and leadership roles for venture-backed startups as well as F500 companies, and his industry experience includes enterprise analytical software, payment processing and security services, and marketing and credit risk decisioning platforms.

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