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DevOps Journal: Article

Could 1,000 DevOps People Be Wrong?

Survey shows application release and delivery process shows much room for improvement

This year like last year, XebiaLabs polled Fortune 1000 companies in banking, manufacturing, healthcare, government and IT, interviewing DevOps teams and everyone from QA to C-level suites. More than 1,000 people were asked to share their perspectives on software delivery trends.

Last year the survey found that application deployments fail up to 30% of the time and that 75% of managers believe their deployment process deserves a failing grade.

This year, the survey revealed little change in attitudes. Once development of a feature or fix is complete, about a third of respondents said it still takes their organization between a week (32%) and a month (36%) to go live with their applications.

High on the list of challenges cited: "Releasing features is too expensive to carry out as frequently as would be desirable."

Last year, 48% of people surveyed said their biggest challenge in the deployment process was "inconsistency across their environment and applications."

This year, more than 50% of respondents cited lack of integration between tools and teams, while almost 40% said, "Too many errors/too much rework."

Most everyone agrees that the software release process is still largely manual and filled with errors. Last year, 40% of people said how the dependency on experts can slow the process down. This year's participants admitted the significant challenge is the lack of internal knowledge and expertise around DevOps and continuous delivery.

This year, DevOps people are almost begging for external partners who can shed insight on continuous delivery. Tooling is important, but finding knowledgeable partners to provide the best practices and vision can overshadow bells and whistles.

Everyone sees the benefit of automation. Together with continuous delivery, the two are cited as the top projects planned for 2014. It must go that way because the current release process bogs everyone down with too many manual tasks that make errors and misconfigured environments inevitable, which all conspire to clog and delay your delivery pipeline.

Organizations expect to deliver up to 20% more applications in 2014, with a notable 37.6% upswing in mobile apps.  But nobody says they will be adding headcount to manage this extra load.

Last year, 57% of respondents feel there was room for improvement in their release process. This year, everyone agrees that developers need to improve their software delivery process by automating it from code drop to user log-in.

The most logical way for them to do so is to implement delivery automation to improve quality and accelerate application delivery, incrementally over time.

For the complete survey, click here to view the infographic.

More Stories By Heather Sill Moses

Heather Sill Moses is the vice president of marketing for XebiaLabs, a provider of application release automation for the continuous delivery of enterprise software (www.xebialabs.com). You may reach her at [email protected]

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