Welcome!

Linux Containers Authors: Zakia Bouachraoui, Elizabeth White, Liz McMillan, Yeshim Deniz, Pat Romanski

Related Topics: @DevOpsSummit, Java IoT, Linux Containers, Containers Expo Blog, Agile Computing, SDN Journal

@DevOpsSummit: Blog Post

DevOps & SDN | @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

Whether it's DevOps or SDN, a key goal is the reduction of variation (complexity) in the network

Kirk Byers at SDN Central writes frequently on the topic of DevOps as it relates (and applies) to the network and recently introduced a list of seven DevOps principles that are applicable in an article entitled, "DevOps and the Chaos Monkey. " On this list is the notion of reducing variation.

This caught my eye because reducing variation is a key goal of Six Sigma and in fact its entire formula is based on measuring the impact of variation in results. The thought is that by measuring deviation from a desired outcome, you can immediately recognize whether changes to a process improve the consistency of the outcome.Quality is achieved by reducing variation, or so the methodology goes.

six-sigma-with-legend

This stems from Six Sigma's origins in lean manufacturing, where automation and standardization are commonly used to improve the quality of products produced, usually by reducing the number of defective products produced.

This is highly applicable to DevOps and the network, where errors are commonly cited as a significant contributor to lag in application deployment timelines caused by the need to troubleshoot such errors. It is easy enough to see the relationship: defective products are not all that much different than defective services, regardless of the cause of the defect.

Number four on Kirk's list addresses this point directly:

#4: Reduce variation.

 

Variation can be good in some contexts, but in the network, variation introduces unexpected errors and unexpected behaviors.

Whether you manage dozens, hundreds, or thousands of network devices, how much of your configuration can be standardized? Can you standardize the OS version? Can you minimize the number of models that you use?   Can you minimize the number of vendors?

Variation increases network complexity, testing complexity, and the complexity of automation tools. It also increases the knowledge that engineers must possess.

Obviously, there are cost and functional trade-offs here, but reducing variation should at least be considered.

What Kirk is saying without saying, is that standardization improves consistency in the network. That's no surprise, as standardization is a key method of reducing operational overhead. Standardization (or "reducing variation" if you prefer) achieves this by addressing network complexity that contributes heavily to operational overhead and variation in outcome (aka errors).

That's because a key contributor to network complexity is the sheer number of boxes that make up the network and complicate topology. These boxes are provisioned and managed according to their unique paradigm, and thus increase the burden on operations and network teams by requiring familiarity with a large number of CLIs, GUIs and APIs. Standardization on a common platform relieves this burden by providing a common CLI, GUI and set of APIs that can be used to provision, manage and control critical services. The shift to a modularized architecture based on a standardized platform increases flexibility and the ability to rapidly introduce new services without incurring the additional operational overhead associated with new, single service solutions. It reduces variation in provisioning, configuration and management (aka architectural debt).

On the other hand, SDN tries to standardize network components through the use of common APIs, protocols, and policies. It seeks to reduce variation in interfaces and policy definitions so components comprising the data plane can be managed as if they were standardized. That's an important distinction, though one that's best left for another day to discuss. Suffice to say that standardization at the API or model layer can leave organizations with significantly reduced capabilities as standardization almost always commoditizes functions at the lowest common set of capabilities.

That is not to say that standardization at the API or protocol layer isn't beneficial. It certainly can and does reduce variation and introduce consistency. The key is to standardize on APIs or protocols that are supportive of the network services you need.

What's important is that standardization on a common service platform can also reduce variation and introduce consistency. Applying one or more standardization efforts should then, ostensibly, net higher benefits.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Lori MacVittie

Lori MacVittie is responsible for education and evangelism of application services available across F5’s entire product suite. Her role includes authorship of technical materials and participation in a number of community-based forums and industry standards organizations, among other efforts. MacVittie has extensive programming experience as an application architect, as well as network and systems development and administration expertise. Prior to joining F5, MacVittie was an award-winning Senior Technology Editor at Network Computing Magazine, where she conducted product research and evaluation focused on integration with application and network architectures, and authored articles on a variety of topics aimed at IT professionals. Her most recent area of focus included SOA-related products and architectures. She holds a B.S. in Information and Computing Science from the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay, and an M.S. in Computer Science from Nova Southeastern University.

IoT & Smart Cities Stories
Bill Schmarzo, author of "Big Data: Understanding How Data Powers Big Business" and "Big Data MBA: Driving Business Strategies with Data Science," is responsible for setting the strategy and defining the Big Data service offerings and capabilities for EMC Global Services Big Data Practice. As the CTO for the Big Data Practice, he is responsible for working with organizations to help them identify where and how to start their big data journeys. He's written several white papers, is an avid blogge...
Nicolas Fierro is CEO of MIMIR Blockchain Solutions. He is a programmer, technologist, and operations dev who has worked with Ethereum and blockchain since 2014. His knowledge in blockchain dates to when he performed dev ops services to the Ethereum Foundation as one the privileged few developers to work with the original core team in Switzerland.
René Bostic is the Technical VP of the IBM Cloud Unit in North America. Enjoying her career with IBM during the modern millennial technological era, she is an expert in cloud computing, DevOps and emerging cloud technologies such as Blockchain. Her strengths and core competencies include a proven record of accomplishments in consensus building at all levels to assess, plan, and implement enterprise and cloud computing solutions. René is a member of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) and a m...
Andrew Keys is Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise. He comes to ConsenSys Enterprise with capital markets, technology and entrepreneurial experience. Previously, he worked for UBS investment bank in equities analysis. Later, he was responsible for the creation and distribution of life settlement products to hedge funds and investment banks. After, he co-founded a revenue cycle management company where he learned about Bitcoin and eventually Ethereal. Andrew's role at ConsenSys Enterprise is a mul...
In his general session at 19th Cloud Expo, Manish Dixit, VP of Product and Engineering at Dice, discussed how Dice leverages data insights and tools to help both tech professionals and recruiters better understand how skills relate to each other and which skills are in high demand using interactive visualizations and salary indicator tools to maximize earning potential. Manish Dixit is VP of Product and Engineering at Dice. As the leader of the Product, Engineering and Data Sciences team at D...
Dynatrace is an application performance management software company with products for the information technology departments and digital business owners of medium and large businesses. Building the Future of Monitoring with Artificial Intelligence. Today we can collect lots and lots of performance data. We build beautiful dashboards and even have fancy query languages to access and transform the data. Still performance data is a secret language only a couple of people understand. The more busine...
Whenever a new technology hits the high points of hype, everyone starts talking about it like it will solve all their business problems. Blockchain is one of those technologies. According to Gartner's latest report on the hype cycle of emerging technologies, blockchain has just passed the peak of their hype cycle curve. If you read the news articles about it, one would think it has taken over the technology world. No disruptive technology is without its challenges and potential impediments t...
If a machine can invent, does this mean the end of the patent system as we know it? The patent system, both in the US and Europe, allows companies to protect their inventions and helps foster innovation. However, Artificial Intelligence (AI) could be set to disrupt the patent system as we know it. This talk will examine how AI may change the patent landscape in the years to come. Furthermore, ways in which companies can best protect their AI related inventions will be examined from both a US and...
Bill Schmarzo, Tech Chair of "Big Data | Analytics" of upcoming CloudEXPO | DXWorldEXPO New York (November 12-13, 2018, New York City) today announced the outline and schedule of the track. "The track has been designed in experience/degree order," said Schmarzo. "So, that folks who attend the entire track can leave the conference with some of the skills necessary to get their work done when they get back to their offices. It actually ties back to some work that I'm doing at the University of San...
When talking IoT we often focus on the devices, the sensors, the hardware itself. The new smart appliances, the new smart or self-driving cars (which are amalgamations of many ‘things'). When we are looking at the world of IoT, we should take a step back, look at the big picture. What value are these devices providing. IoT is not about the devices, its about the data consumed and generated. The devices are tools, mechanisms, conduits. This paper discusses the considerations when dealing with the...