Welcome!

Linux Containers Authors: Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Zakia Bouachraoui, Pat Romanski, Stefana Muller

Related Topics: Linux Containers

Linux Containers: Article

Installing Linux on a laptop still tricky

Better know the BIOS before you buy a laptop. If it wants a plug-and-play OS, keep shopping.

(LinuxWorld) -- I bought my first laptop two years ago in preparation for my first (and the event's second) Linux World Conference and Expo (LWCE). It was a used ChemBook I purchased from a friend in the local Linux User Group. It had two easily removable hard drives, one of which contained a working installation of Red Hat. Back in 1999, it was still a bit unusual to run Linux on a laptop.

A couple of weeks ago, after four LWCEs, one USENIX, and an ALS, my trusty traveling companion gave up the ghost while I tried to install a new distribution of Linux. I bought a new laptop that I'll break in at the LWCE in San Francisco this week. To be completely accurate, I bought two new laptops; an HP Pavilion and a Sony Vaio. But I had to return the HP due to BIOS problems.

The HP was my first choice, primarily because it promised to deliver more computer for the buck. It offers a fast Athlon processor, 256 megabytes of RAM, built-in modem and Ethernet, and a 20-gigabyte hard drive. I was confident I could install Linux without a hassle.

Unbeknownst to me, it also came with a BIOS that does not offer an option for specifying a non-plug-and-play OS. If you run Linux this means that the onboard PCI devices are not initialized at boot time, because the BIOS expects the operating system to handle that on its own. Linux plugs-and-plays on some ISA cards, but it's problematic on PCI. When I discovered the BIOS limitation, I sent the Pavilion packing. The Sony Vaio was my second choice.

On to the Sony

The Vaio sports a 750-MHz Pentium III, 128 megabytes of RAM, and a 20-gigabyte drive. What it lacks in speed and RAM, however, it makes up for with a removable CD-RW drive and handy docking station. Both came with Windows; the HP with Windows ME and the Sony with Windows 2000.

The first step was to install some decent software. I inserted the first CD from the Red Hat 7.1 install set and powered up. The Vaio booted from the CD without having to first be told in BIOS to look there first. I was halfway through the installation before I remembered the reason I had returned the HP. I rebooted, and as soon as the Sony screen appeared, I pressed the Escape key. That took me into the BIOS setup where I found the needed option. I changed the default "Yes, it is a plug-and-play OS" to "No, it's not." I saved the configuration and restarted the installation.

Red Hat detected its laptop environs and offered me a default laptop installation, which I accepted. I selected Gnome for the desktop environment (KDE purists, please withhold your flames) and the games package for whiling away the hours in airplanes and airports. The Windows 2000 installation conveniently came with C: and D: partitions of roughly equal size. I used DiskDruid to free up what had been drive D: and made it into Linux swap, boot, and root partitions. Then I just let the installation run. It took less than 20 minutes to complete.

Even the X Window System installation was painless. Red Hat identified the video card and suggested 1028 x 768 resolution, which worked the first time. With the HP Pavilion, I had been forced to resort to a post-install frame buffer configuration. Not a horrible thing in and of itself, but a pain nonetheless.

A quick boot in Windows 2000 to make sure it was still there and functional. (I love how Red Hat refers to it as DOS when it built the LILO configuration for dual boot.) Windows 2000 worked fine, so I rebooted again and returned to the now-default Linux.

Now to the goodies. I ran sndconfig and it told me that I had a Yamaha YMF-744B DS-1S Audio Controller. I listened to Linus Torvalds demonstrate how he pronounces Linux ("LYNN-ux"). Bingo. The next time I restarted the GNOME desktop I had all the standard bells and whistles.

The modem, unfortunately, is of that genre known as "Win modems." They require the OS to provide all or part of the driver. Besides taxing the OS with an additional workload, these strange beasts also have the odd effect of making the device OS dependent. While Linux supports many Win modems, I don't like them. I scavenged the PCMCIA Zoom 56kb modem from the old ChemBook. It works perfectly.

So now, like me, the laptop is good to go as far as LWCE in San Francisco is concerned. I've got a modem, Internet access, and a full-sized keyboard to use once I'm there. My fat little fingers are just not comfortable on a notebook keyboard.

More Stories By Joe Barr

Joe Barr is a freelance journalist covering Linux, open source and network security. His 'Version Control' column has been a regular feature of Linux.SYS-CON.com since its inception. As far as we know, he is the only living journalist whose works have appeared both in phrack, the legendary underground zine, and IBM Personal Systems Magazine.

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


IoT & Smart Cities Stories
Moroccanoil®, the global leader in oil-infused beauty, is thrilled to announce the NEW Moroccanoil Color Depositing Masks, a collection of dual-benefit hair masks that deposit pure pigments while providing the treatment benefits of a deep conditioning mask. The collection consists of seven curated shades for commitment-free, beautifully-colored hair that looks and feels healthy.
The textured-hair category is inarguably the hottest in the haircare space today. This has been driven by the proliferation of founder brands started by curly and coily consumers and savvy consumers who increasingly want products specifically for their texture type. This trend is underscored by the latest insights from NaturallyCurly's 2018 TextureTrends report, released today. According to the 2018 TextureTrends Report, more than 80 percent of women with curly and coily hair say they purcha...
The textured-hair category is inarguably the hottest in the haircare space today. This has been driven by the proliferation of founder brands started by curly and coily consumers and savvy consumers who increasingly want products specifically for their texture type. This trend is underscored by the latest insights from NaturallyCurly's 2018 TextureTrends report, released today. According to the 2018 TextureTrends Report, more than 80 percent of women with curly and coily hair say they purcha...
We all love the many benefits of natural plant oils, used as a deap treatment before shampooing, at home or at the beach, but is there an all-in-one solution for everyday intensive nutrition and modern styling?I am passionate about the benefits of natural extracts with tried-and-tested results, which I have used to develop my own brand (lemon for its acid ph, wheat germ for its fortifying action…). I wanted a product which combined caring and styling effects, and which could be used after shampo...
The platform combines the strengths of Singtel's extensive, intelligent network capabilities with Microsoft's cloud expertise to create a unique solution that sets new standards for IoT applications," said Mr Diomedes Kastanis, Head of IoT at Singtel. "Our solution provides speed, transparency and flexibility, paving the way for a more pervasive use of IoT to accelerate enterprises' digitalisation efforts. AI-powered intelligent connectivity over Microsoft Azure will be the fastest connected pat...
There are many examples of disruption in consumer space – Uber disrupting the cab industry, Airbnb disrupting the hospitality industry and so on; but have you wondered who is disrupting support and operations? AISERA helps make businesses and customers successful by offering consumer-like user experience for support and operations. We have built the world’s first AI-driven IT / HR / Cloud / Customer Support and Operations solution.
Codete accelerates their clients growth through technological expertise and experience. Codite team works with organizations to meet the challenges that digitalization presents. Their clients include digital start-ups as well as established enterprises in the IT industry. To stay competitive in a highly innovative IT industry, strong R&D departments and bold spin-off initiatives is a must. Codete Data Science and Software Architects teams help corporate clients to stay up to date with the mod...
At CloudEXPO Silicon Valley, June 24-26, 2019, Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with expanded DevOpsSUMMIT and FinTechEXPO programs within the DXWorldEXPO agenda. Successful transformation requires a laser focus on being data-driven and on using all the tools available that enable transformation if they plan to survive over the long term. A total of 88% of Fortune 500 companies from a generation ago are now out of business. Only 12% still survive. Similar percentages are found throug...
Druva is the global leader in Cloud Data Protection and Management, delivering the industry's first data management-as-a-service solution that aggregates data from endpoints, servers and cloud applications and leverages the public cloud to offer a single pane of glass to enable data protection, governance and intelligence-dramatically increasing the availability and visibility of business critical information, while reducing the risk, cost and complexity of managing and protecting it. Druva's...
BMC has unmatched experience in IT management, supporting 92 of the Forbes Global 100, and earning recognition as an ITSM Gartner Magic Quadrant Leader for five years running. Our solutions offer speed, agility, and efficiency to tackle business challenges in the areas of service management, automation, operations, and the mainframe.