Welcome!

Linux Containers Authors: Liz McMillan, Simon Hill, Elizabeth White, Vaibhaw Pandey, Pat Romanski

Related Topics: Linux Containers

Linux Containers: Article

MPlayer: The project from hell

MPlayer works fine once you get past the tyro-written installation script & docs

(LinuxWorld) -- In the year since it first appeared on freshmeat, the popular watering hole for Linux software, a relatively small new project headed up by Arpad Gereoffy has shoved everything else out of the way to become the most popular offering on the site save Linux itself. The project is MPlayer, and it provides Linux users with a tool to let them view videos in almost every popular flavor, including MPEG 1 and 2, and AVI. It also plays video from DVDs. When it is installed and configured correctly, it's a doozy. That's the good news.

The bad news is the installation stinks, configuration is a black art, and the documentation is barren. Worse yet, Gereoffy and the other developers have more attitude than the law allows. At least the law in this county, and I'm the sheriff. In just a year, that attitude has gotten them on the wrong side of Red Hat, of Russian developers porting a clone to OS/2, and many of their own users.

The MPlayer gang seems to relish nothing more than belittling their users and reminding them of just how little they know about Linux and computing in general. I don't know about the rest of you, but I suffer enough of that on my own. I do not need any outside assistance to reinforce that point of view.

Naturally, I was drawn to the project like a moth to a flame. Bring it on, I thought. Whatever it takes, I'll get it installed. I won't be asking that infantile band of RTFM-spewing bozos who maintain it for help, either. My own hardheadedness is probably the only reason I sit here today with MPlayer installed, with a custom GUI skin enabled no less, barely more than a full day after I started.

Custom MPlayer skin

The journey began when I downloaded the latest CVS snapshot from the MPlayer Web site (see the Resources section for the URL). The attitude I mentioned earlier was noticeable in the comments on the project's page at freshmeat, both in the MPlayer team's remarks about gcc 2.96 and MPlayer users' remarks about the project team. One user referred to the MPlayer team as "the project from hell."

Actually, the team's infamous anti-Red Hat rhetoric has been toned down slightly. At Red Hat's request, some false statements the developers made about 2.96 have been removed from MPlayer's Web site. The team still lets you know at every opportunity what they think of Red Hat, which gets tiresome fast.

I was prepared for the typical ./configure; make; make install and expected to have MPlayer running in less than five minutes. Was I ever wrong. The first thing to bite me was the configure script itself. It refused to run after detecting gcc 2.96, which is the default with Mandrake 8.1. Reading back over the generated log messages, I found that I could bypass the ban/warning by adding --disable-gcc-checking to the configure command. Run with that parameter, the script halts and waits for you to hit enter to acknowledge the final warning about not using Red Hat's most notorious offering. I did, and the configure script finally set about its work. make and make install (run as root) followed with no visible problems. I thought I was set.

Wrong again. Mind you, I had just run the install script. But when I tried to execute MPlayer for the first time, it barfed because it couldn't find the codec configuration file (codecs.conf) in either of the two default directories where the program expects it to be. Oh, the file is there all right, buried in a subdirectory in the MPlayer installation directory. More digging around in the documentation, the FAQ, actually, and I found the missing file and the cure. Finally, mplayer runs. There is no GUI and it halts immediately, but it runs. It wants a file name on the command line.

I needed video files. That called for gnutella. I downloaded gtk-gnutella and installed it. It configured, built, and installed itself properly in no time at all. In a few minutes I managed to snag an .avi or two, a couple of .mpeg's, and an .asf video. The first mpeg file I played displayed beautifully. The sound was nice, too. However, the second mpeg, avi, and asf wouldn't play at all. It seems the Win32 codecs, a huge reason for MPlayer's popularity, are not supported by default. Neither is the GUI. I decided it was time to RTFM.

Don't get me wrong. There is documentation. It is scattered, and often incomplete, and carries the same attitude I had seen elsewhere, but it is there. An example of that attitude, taken verbatim from the FAQ:

Q: I compiled MPlayer with libdvdcss/libdivxdecore support, but when I try to start it, it says: error while loading shared libraries: lib*.so.0: cannot load shared object file: No such file or directory

I checked the file and it is there in /usr/local/lib.

A: What are you doing on Linux? Can't you install a library? Why do we get these questions? It's not MPlayer specific at all! Add /usr/local/lib to /etc/ld.so.conf and run ldconfig. Or install it to /usr/lib, because if you can't solve the /usr/local problem, you are careless enough to do such things.

Perhaps instead of taking the time to flame the person asking the question, the smart aleck could have simply answered the question graciously, then spent the time saved by skipping the flames fixing bugs in the installation script.

Eventually I negotiated my way through the installation minefield created by the agonizing installation and poor design. I stepped through it one gotcha at a time. I won't bore you with a tedious play-by-play, but I will mention that I had more bite marks than I would have if I had napped in a fire ant mound. Here's a short tip sheet that might help fellow travelers coming down this path. It's not complete, and it won't replace the documentation, but these tips might save you some aggravation.

  1. Dependencies noted on freshmeat included gcc 2.95.3, libdvdcss, and libdvdread. However, I used gcc 2.96 and had zero problems. It doesn't bother to mention that if you want the GUI, you are also going to need to have gtk installed. You will also need the unzip and bunzip2 archiving tools installed.
  2. In addition to the two DVD libraries, download these files from the MPlayer download page:
    • MPlayer-current.tar.bz2 (the program)
    • mp-arial-iso-8859-1.zip (Western European fonts)
    • win32codec-0.50.zip (codecs required for Windows formats)
    • default.tar.bz2 (the default skin for the GUI, or one of the others available)
  3. Ignore the remarks in the installation docs that have you looking for an install.sh script for the DVD tools. It doesn't exist. Just move or copy the DVD libraries to /usr/local/lib. Then make sure that directory is included in /etc/ld.so.conf and run ldconfig.
  4. If you want to use gcc 2.96 like I did, you must add --disable-gcc-checking to the configure command line. If you want to build the GUI, you must also add --enable-gui to the line.
  5. Examine the .mplayer subdirectory that the installation creates in your home directory. If there is no codecs.conf file present, copy it from the MPlayer installation/etc subdirectory. Also, copy from that same subdirectory the example.conf file and rename it to config. Then edit config so that only the gui and the skin lines are left uncommented. You can experiment with the other config options at your leisure.
  6. If the font subdirectory does not exist in the .mplayer directory, create it. Then unzip the downloaded fonts into a temporary directory, select the size font you want and copy the contents of the subdirectory for that size to the .mplayer/font directory.
  7. If the Skin (note the capital S) subdirectory does not exist in the .mplayer directory, create it. Decompress and untar the skin you downloaded, then move the subdirectory it creates into the .mplayer/Skin directory. If you chose the default, for example, your directory structure will be ~/.mplayer/Skin/default.
  8. When all else fails, take a deep breath and RTFM. Read both FAQS and the online manual, too, if only to learn how not to create effective documentation.

I'm sure I missed a gotcha or two along the way, but those should help. I don't believe that anything I mentioned is absent from the documentation, but many of them are out of place. They belong in the "things you need to know first" category, rather than where you eventually find them.

Software by Marquis de Sade

The entire installation and design process is so poor that it seems as if the developers laid a minefield for users purposely so that they could torment them. I can forgive the poor English, but the outright contempt for hapless users is inexpiable.

The installation script causes MPlayer to crash the first time it is run. It fails to create needed directories, and it fails to move required configuration files to the proper location. A well-written installation script would create the directories and place files where they belong. After that sort of performance, the developers have no justification for their arrogance. This project is popular, at least in terms of interest on freshmeat, and it does seem to have produced some nice code. Unless the project leader and his crew grow up and learn there is more to it than the coding, that popularity won't last.

More Stories By Joe Barr

Joe Barr is a freelance journalist covering Linux, open source and network security. His 'Version Control' column has been a regular feature of Linux.SYS-CON.com since its inception. As far as we know, he is the only living journalist whose works have appeared both in phrack, the legendary underground zine, and IBM Personal Systems Magazine.

Comments (14) View Comments

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


Most Recent Comments
MCR 10/11/04 07:54:05 PM EDT

Re Adrian: Maybe you should actually read the article, wherein Mr. Barr stated that configure wouldn't run after detecting gcc. That being just the first of many difficulties, most of them occurring *after* the installation.

Adrian 10/01/04 03:43:58 AM EDT

How hard can be to run this: ./configure,make, make install? Maybe Mr Barr should use only the MS win. There are some very easy to use, stupid proof installers. Or maybe he should buy the lattest computer with a 3GHz+ CPU so that he can use the MS media player. This way he does not need to install anything

Brian Eller 04/18/04 09:38:36 AM EDT

Install from any source is HARD.
Well not always, however setting up install scripts is not
just run a few automated tools, it TAKES REAL WORK
and you can't just pass off a hard source install when
there are binary releases,
sure they are sometimes a little dated, but they are much easier to install

john 03/24/04 09:46:42 PM EST

thanx for the write up and help with mplayer :)

it is folks like you(z) that will help bring down the mighty gates of windoze..

Rob 03/24/04 07:16:05 PM EST

Hey, give the guy a break, we're not all experts yet! :)
Anyway, I found the comments on installing the codec config file useful as I was too lazy to scrutinize the docs, but I agree that installation must be made easier, and the sooner the better! *** Great news about the European Union's fine of $600 million on Microsoft! Ouch, serves them damn right! Justice lives in Europe (lets hope they lose the appeal.)

Carl McKenzie 02/16/04 02:44:46 PM EST

I tried installing mplayer from rpm, but none of the rpms I downloaded would even install on fedora.
I ended up installing from a tarball, which was made much easier thanks to the guide at http://www.mjmwired.net/resources/mplayer-fedora.htm.
As many people said, my problems are probably caused by the crippled distro, but I only have dialup internet so im restricted to what I can get through my polytech course

A.S. aka tomato 12/24/03 09:27:30 PM EST

I used to read "./configure --help" before running it. :) And taking a short glance, what do README and/or INSTALL files say...

Rainer Lehrig 10/06/03 05:40:37 AM EDT

I use SuSE Linux which can install MPlayer from it's DVD using YaST.
But the SuSE version doesn't support a lot of codecs.
It's castrated. (Same as in RedHat ?)
So I had to install the original version.
The only problem I remember was that I had to supply --enable-gui to configure.

Joe 10/04/03 04:49:17 PM EDT

I just use LindowsOS which keeps MPlayer updated via Click-N-Run. I've never had to install it (I wouldn't know how).

Joe

Randall P 10/03/03 04:20:49 PM EDT

Redhat is getting soo super conservative they have even removed the sudo ramblings (My monkey can type better than you.). Modified the gnome screensavers so they now have linux tips instead of random ramblings. The nerve of those guys. Id like to see mysql group rip off all of the oracle redhat advanced server GNU code and make MySQL work via clustering with all the same features.

Joe 10/03/03 04:04:07 PM EDT

I agree with you. Arrogance is the mark of a small person.

JT 10/03/03 12:31:32 PM EDT

It seems that you're same level of knowledge as joe average, compiling from source is _not_ your thing. And why CVS build, there are releases too? I never had problems with MPlayer, aah, but I read documentation. And that Red Hat compiler was buggy and unsupported by GCC team.For god sake, it was devel version from CVS, only heavily patched by Red Hat. Use RPM's, compiling source belongs to us who know how to read(documentation) and use standard tools.

REd 10/03/03 11:22:00 AM EDT

you should try gentoo then... install works beautifly and none of those silly missing codec warnings, even that exists in MS media players...So for what its worth your concentrating on all the negatives, not a well rounded review. Who cares what the developers of mplayer think of Redhat. You know what, there is a crackhead that lives nextdoor to me who thinks im a bad neighbor, who cares! Opinions are like assholes. Got one, yours stinks.

R. L. 10/03/03 10:29:21 AM EDT

Joe,

The best way for RedHat users to install Mplayer is to get the rpm from www.freshrpms.net.

http://ftp.freshrpms.net/pub/freshrpms/redhat/9/mplayer/mplayer-1.0-0.1....

@ThingsExpo Stories
It is of utmost importance for the future success of WebRTC to ensure that interoperability is operational between web browsers and any WebRTC-compliant client. To be guaranteed as operational and effective, interoperability must be tested extensively by establishing WebRTC data and media connections between different web browsers running on different devices and operating systems. In his session at WebRTC Summit at @ThingsExpo, Dr. Alex Gouaillard, CEO and Founder of CoSMo Software, presented ...
Gemini is Yahoo’s native and search advertising platform. To ensure the quality of a complex distributed system that spans multiple products and components and across various desktop websites and mobile app and web experiences – both Yahoo owned and operated and third-party syndication (supply), with complex interaction with more than a billion users and numerous advertisers globally (demand) – it becomes imperative to automate a set of end-to-end tests 24x7 to detect bugs and regression. In th...
"Space Monkey by Vivent Smart Home is a product that is a distributed cloud-based edge storage network. Vivent Smart Home, our parent company, is a smart home provider that places a lot of hard drives across homes in North America," explained JT Olds, Director of Engineering, and Brandon Crowfeather, Product Manager, at Vivint Smart Home, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at @ThingsExpo, held Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA.
"Cloud Academy is an enterprise training platform for the cloud, specifically public clouds. We offer guided learning experiences on AWS, Azure, Google Cloud and all the surrounding methodologies and technologies that you need to know and your teams need to know in order to leverage the full benefits of the cloud," explained Alex Brower, VP of Marketing at Cloud Academy, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 21st Cloud Expo, held Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clar...
"MobiDev is a software development company and we do complex, custom software development for everybody from entrepreneurs to large enterprises," explained Alan Winters, U.S. Head of Business Development at MobiDev, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 21st Cloud Expo, held Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA.
SYS-CON Events announced today that CrowdReviews.com has been named “Media Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 22nd International Cloud Expo, which will take place on June 5–7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. CrowdReviews.com is a transparent online platform for determining which products and services are the best based on the opinion of the crowd. The crowd consists of Internet users that have experienced products and services first-hand and have an interest in letting other potential buye...
"There's plenty of bandwidth out there but it's never in the right place. So what Cedexis does is uses data to work out the best pathways to get data from the origin to the person who wants to get it," explained Simon Jones, Evangelist and Head of Marketing at Cedexis, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 21st Cloud Expo, held Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA.
"IBM is really all in on blockchain. We take a look at sort of the history of blockchain ledger technologies. It started out with bitcoin, Ethereum, and IBM evaluated these particular blockchain technologies and found they were anonymous and permissionless and that many companies were looking for permissioned blockchain," stated René Bostic, Technical VP of the IBM Cloud Unit in North America, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 21st Cloud Expo, held Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Conventi...
WebRTC is great technology to build your own communication tools. It will be even more exciting experience it with advanced devices, such as a 360 Camera, 360 microphone, and a depth sensor camera. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Masashi Ganeko, a manager at INFOCOM Corporation, introduced two experimental projects from his team and what they learned from them. "Shotoku Tamago" uses the robot audition software HARK to track speakers in 360 video of a remote party. "Virtual Teleport" uses a multip...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Telecom Reseller has been named “Media Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 22nd International Cloud Expo, which will take place on June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York, NY. Telecom Reseller reports on Unified Communications, UCaaS, BPaaS for enterprise and SMBs. They report extensively on both customer premises based solutions such as IP-PBX as well as cloud based and hosted platforms.
Coca-Cola’s Google powered digital signage system lays the groundwork for a more valuable connection between Coke and its customers. Digital signs pair software with high-resolution displays so that a message can be changed instantly based on what the operator wants to communicate or sell. In their Day 3 Keynote at 21st Cloud Expo, Greg Chambers, Global Group Director, Digital Innovation, Coca-Cola, and Vidya Nagarajan, a Senior Product Manager at Google, discussed how from store operations and ...
In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Carl J. Levine, Senior Technical Evangelist for NS1, will objectively discuss how DNS is used to solve Digital Transformation challenges in large SaaS applications, CDNs, AdTech platforms, and other demanding use cases. Carl J. Levine is the Senior Technical Evangelist for NS1. A veteran of the Internet Infrastructure space, he has over a decade of experience with startups, networking protocols and Internet infrastructure, combined with the unique ability to it...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Evatronix will exhibit at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Evatronix SA offers comprehensive solutions in the design and implementation of electronic systems, in CAD / CAM deployment, and also is a designer and manufacturer of advanced 3D scanners for professional applications.
Leading companies, from the Global Fortune 500 to the smallest companies, are adopting hybrid cloud as the path to business advantage. Hybrid cloud depends on cloud services and on-premises infrastructure working in unison. Successful implementations require new levels of data mobility, enabled by an automated and seamless flow across on-premises and cloud resources. In his general session at 21st Cloud Expo, Greg Tevis, an IBM Storage Software Technical Strategist and Customer Solution Architec...
A strange thing is happening along the way to the Internet of Things, namely far too many devices to work with and manage. It has become clear that we'll need much higher efficiency user experiences that can allow us to more easily and scalably work with the thousands of devices that will soon be in each of our lives. Enter the conversational interface revolution, combining bots we can literally talk with, gesture to, and even direct with our thoughts, with embedded artificial intelligence, whic...
To get the most out of their data, successful companies are not focusing on queries and data lakes, they are actively integrating analytics into their operations with a data-first application development approach. Real-time adjustments to improve revenues, reduce costs, or mitigate risk rely on applications that minimize latency on a variety of data sources. In his session at @BigDataExpo, Jack Norris, Senior Vice President, Data and Applications at MapR Technologies, reviewed best practices to ...
An increasing number of companies are creating products that combine data with analytical capabilities. Running interactive queries on Big Data requires complex architectures to store and query data effectively, typically involving data streams, an choosing efficient file format/database and multiple independent systems that are tied together through custom-engineered pipelines. In his session at @BigDataExpo at @ThingsExpo, Tomer Levi, a senior software engineer at Intel’s Advanced Analytics gr...
When talking IoT we often focus on the devices, the sensors, the hardware itself. The new smart appliances, the new smart or self-driving cars (which are amalgamations of many ‘things’). When we are looking at the world of IoT, we should take a step back, look at the big picture. What value are these devices providing? IoT is not about the devices, it’s about the data consumed and generated. The devices are tools, mechanisms, conduits. In his session at Internet of Things at Cloud Expo | DXWor...
Everything run by electricity will eventually be connected to the Internet. Get ahead of the Internet of Things revolution. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Akvelon expert and IoT industry leader Sergey Grebnov provided an educational dive into the world of managing your home, workplace and all the devices they contain with the power of machine-based AI and intelligent Bot services for a completely streamlined experience.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Synametrics Technologies will exhibit at SYS-CON's 22nd International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York, NY. Synametrics Technologies is a privately held company based in Plainsboro, New Jersey that has been providing solutions for the developer community since 1997. Based on the success of its initial product offerings such as WinSQL, Xeams, SynaMan and Syncrify, Synametrics continues to create and hone inn...