Welcome!

Linux Containers Authors: Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Yeshim Deniz, Zakia Bouachraoui, Carmen Gonzalez

Related Topics: Linux Containers

Linux Containers: Article

A New Open Letter to Darl McBride

A New Open Letter to Darl McBride

Dear Darl McBride,

I have been reading various comments by you recently about how you think the Open Source Community should bow the head and bend the knee to your gentle efforts at making a workable "business model."

The problem I personally have with that is that I actually proposed a workable business model for SCO's previous incarnation, Caldera, to stay an Open Source company even while it digested the remains of the original Santa Cruz Operation and came to terms with the relicts of AT&T's proprietary code (osOpinion: SCO into Caldera Without Getting SCalded).

Unfortunately osOpinion is off-line now, so I can't point you to that particular article, but my thesis then was that Caldera could do a lot worse than seek to develop the current SCO OpenServer channels - for which it bought out most of the original SCO - into an Open Source Community. At the time I had not thought it through thoroughly enough, so I must apologize for lack of clarity.

But the idea was simple - companies like Netscape had made the best of a bad situation by releasing Netscape as Open Source Software, and had thus rescued their software from mothballing and their company from total uselessness. While Caldera had bought SCO's Unix assets on the basis of using the then large distribution channels.

Unfortunately, the channels don't seem to have benefitted Caldera as much as it would have liked, apparently because of Operating System loyalty - they made their living off OpenServer, and weren't about to budge.

My idea was by releasing OpenServer and UnixWare as Open Source Software, to turn the distribution channels into software development partners, and hopefully turn the IT support staff at the end-user companies like McDonalds and Papa John's Pizza, etc, into software development partners too; and end the inevitable whingeing that IT staff and distribution channels get into when they need a bug fix or a feature that their supplier is not able or interested in doing.

I had the idea that perhaps the BSD/MIT license would be appropriate, since every man and his dog (Sorry, Gates and Ballmer, I wasn't referring to you - go back to sleep.) seemed to think it was better than the GPL.

I later developed the idea that a two-layer support contract thing would have been the way to go - with Caldera retaining the SCO contracts, but adding the twist that if the channel or end-user decides to do their own debugging and returning viable fixes, they get a discount on the terms of their contract in return. Quid pro quo.

Looking back at my idea, I wonder how long it would take before everybody was in on it - for the good and simple reason that everybody wants the cheaper rates, and paying the local college students to do the hard work is cheaper than paying a twenty-percent higher annual contract fee. Not long, I'd say.

But I never got around to developing the idea properly and explaining it to the Caldera management, and then Ransom Love left - and he was the only one who might have understood the idea and been able to do something with it.

It's too late now to do anything about it, seeing as you have undertaken to destroy every shred of goodwill Caldera (now SCO Group) had built up. Unfortunately my business instructors never went into detail on the reverse of "goodwill" - goodwill being defined as the attempt to quantify a positive reaction to own's brandname, an attempt to put a value on someone else's willingness to do business with one - so as far as I can see, you're now attempting to fill in where my instructors left off.

And as far as the Unix SVRx and its cognates OpenServer and UnixWare go, you've destroyed their value as well. No one could put a value of $699.00 on the source code mentioned, let alone the compiled binaries by themselves, and retain any self-respect.

Sincerely Yours

Wesley Parish

More Stories By Wesley Parish

Wesley Parish is a Linux user based in New Zealand.

Comments (5)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


IoT & Smart Cities Stories
As you know, enterprise IT conversation over the past year have often centered upon the open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In fact, Kubernetes has emerged as the key technology -- and even primary platform -- of cloud migrations for a wide variety of organizations. Kubernetes is critical to forward-looking enterprises that continue to push their IT infrastructures toward maximum functionality, scalability, and flexibility. As they do so, IT professionals are also embr...
At CloudEXPO Silicon Valley, June 24-26, 2019, Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with expanded DevOpsSUMMIT and FinTechEXPO programs within the DXWorldEXPO agenda. Successful transformation requires a laser focus on being data-driven and on using all the tools available that enable transformation if they plan to survive over the long term. A total of 88% of Fortune 500 companies from a generation ago are now out of business. Only 12% still survive. Similar percentages are found throug...
At CloudEXPO Silicon Valley, June 24-26, 2019, Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with expanded DevOpsSUMMIT and FinTechEXPO programs within the DXWorldEXPO agenda. Successful transformation requires a laser focus on being data-driven and on using all the tools available that enable transformation if they plan to survive over the long term. A total of 88% of Fortune 500 companies from a generation ago are now out of business. Only 12% still survive. Similar percentages are found throug...
Atmosera delivers modern cloud services that maximize the advantages of cloud-based infrastructures. Offering private, hybrid, and public cloud solutions, Atmosera works closely with customers to engineer, deploy, and operate cloud architectures with advanced services that deliver strategic business outcomes. Atmosera's expertise simplifies the process of cloud transformation and our 20+ years of experience managing complex IT environments provides our customers with the confidence and trust tha...
AI and machine learning disruption for Enterprises started happening in the areas such as IT operations management (ITOPs) and Cloud management and SaaS apps. In 2019 CIOs will see disruptive solutions for Cloud & Devops, AI/ML driven IT Ops and Cloud Ops. Customers want AI-driven multi-cloud operations for monitoring, detection, prevention of disruptions. Disruptions cause revenue loss, unhappy users, impacts brand reputation etc.
As you know, enterprise IT conversation over the past year have often centered upon the open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In fact, Kubernetes has emerged as the key technology -- and even primary platform -- of cloud migrations for a wide variety of organizations. Kubernetes is critical to forward-looking enterprises that continue to push their IT infrastructures toward maximum functionality, scalability, and flexibility.
The Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) is a non-profit organization that provides business support services to companies expanding to Japan. With the support of JETRO's dedicated staff, clients can incorporate their business; receive visa, immigration, and HR support; find dedicated office space; identify local government subsidies; get tailored market studies; and more.
Today's workforce is trading their cubicles and corporate desktops in favor of an any-location, any-device work style. And as digital natives make up more and more of the modern workforce, the appetite for user-friendly, cloud-based services grows. The center of work is shifting to the user and to the cloud. But managing a proliferation of SaaS, web, and mobile apps running on any number of clouds and devices is unwieldy and increases security risks. Steve Wilson, Citrix Vice President of Cloud,...
When Enterprises started adopting Hadoop-based Big Data environments over the last ten years, they were mainly on-premise deployments. Organizations would spin up and manage large Hadoop clusters, where they would funnel exabytes or petabytes of unstructured data.However, over the last few years the economics of maintaining this enormous infrastructure compared with the elastic scalability of viable cloud options has changed this equation. The growth of cloud storage, cloud-managed big data e...
Artificial intelligence, machine learning, neural networks. We're in the midst of a wave of excitement around AI such as hasn't been seen for a few decades. But those previous periods of inflated expectations led to troughs of disappointment. This time is (mostly) different. Applications of AI such as predictive analytics are already decreasing costs and improving reliability of industrial machinery. Pattern recognition can equal or exceed the ability of human experts in some domains. It's devel...