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SCO’s Operating Assets Sold

The SCO Group sold its operating assets Monday for $600,000 to an operation temporarily called UnXis Inc

Poor benighted Unix has been shifted again for the fourth time.

The SCO Group sold its operating assets Monday for $600,000 to an operation temporarily called UnXis Inc whose press release memorializing the long-sought transfer was datelined Dubai.

Novell ultimately didn't challenge the sale, but the announcement sent Groklaw straight up the wall because UnXis claimed it got the Unix and UnixWare trademarks that Groklaw says were turned over to X/Open ages ago.

SCO, which retains the litigation, could still present a problem if the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver gives it leave to continue prosecuting its suit against IBM for fleshing out Linux with Unix code SCO thought it bought from Novell. UnXis says it's indemnified against any legal costs.

UnXis, which is owned by Stephen Norris, co-founder of the mighty Carlyle Group, and MerchantBridge, an international private equity house, is promising to put $25 million into SCO's hand-me-down widgetry over the next 18 months and means to build on SCO's 32,000 customer contracts in 82 countries, including McDonald's, Siemens, Sperbank, China Post, Thomson Reuters and the US Defense Department.

The company has appointed Richard Bolandz CEO. In his career, he has led competitive strategy, corporate development and technology commercialization at Qwest, MCI and Unisys Global Outsourcing & Infrastructure Services.

UnXis got the slim remains of SCO's workforce, which it intends to flesh out by "doubling resources in engineering, technical support and customer relationship management." It also plans to take its new assets into the cloud and said, "We foresee our software becoming a critical component of the new Internet highways currently being developed in the Middle and Far East, from Riyadh to Beijing."

Besides the emerging markets, UnXis plans to chase resellers, former end users and large Fortune 500s where it has existing relationships and contacts.

More Stories By Maureen O'Gara

Maureen O'Gara the most read technology reporter for the past 20 years, is the Cloud Computing and Virtualization News Desk editor of SYS-CON Media. She is the publisher of famous "Billygrams" and the editor-in-chief of "Client/Server News" for more than a decade. One of the most respected technology reporters in the business, Maureen can be reached by email at maureen(at)sys-con.com or paperboy(at)g2news.com, and by phone at 516 759-7025. Twitter: @MaureenOGara

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mpellatt 04/21/11 01:40:00 AM EDT

Correction: It isn't Groklaw that says that the Unix and Unixware trademarks were turned over to X/Open ages ago. Novell said it at the time of the transfer, and The Open Group (X/Open's current name, and the current owner) says it on its website - both far more authoritative than Groklaw, and far more than just a "claim", but a statement of irrefutable fact.